labor law

Labor lawyer Robert M. Schwartz, author of The Legal Rights of Union Stewards, has generously turned over his five immensely popular handbooks to Labor Notes. We asked Schwartz about his experience writing and publishing the books.

Bosses are in love with zero tolerance policies. One arbitrator calls them “the last refuge of weak managers.”

Zero tolerance policies authorize employers to discharge workers who commit specified infractions without consideration of the surrounding circumstances, length of service, or the employee’s lack of prior discipline.

The richest university in the world, with an endowment of $36 billion, is asking the National Labor Relations Board to change how union elections are run. Harvard University sees itself in the vanguard of resistance to the Trump administration. So why is the university now courting the support of Trump's appointees by challenging an obscure—but far-reaching—labor relations rule?

UPDATE, February 2018: As we feared when we published the below article in September 2017, the Trump NLRB wasted little time before overruling the Lutheran Heritage standard. On December 14, 2017, by a 3-2 majority, the Board announced that it would henceforth apply a balancing test to determine the legality of work rules which, although neutral on their face, are likely to deter employees from engaging in concerted activity.

With the election of Donald Trump as president and Republican majorities in both the House and Senate, we are entering a period of existential crisis for unions and our organized power. The coming months and years are going to call for a spirit of maximum solidarity.

A new Labor Board ruling could finally unstick the unionization of professors in the private sector—a project that’s been stalled for 35 years.

Employer unfair labor practices can be a gift in disguise, providing a defense against the most dangerous employer weapons. Unions can use ULPs to help win contract campaigns, strikes, and other confrontations.

In a highly unusual management-led action, employees paralyzed the company’s 71 stores and promoted a devastating consumer boycott to get CEO Arthur T. Demoulas back. The struggle contains lessons for organized labor.

Labor Notes' Samantha Winslow discussed the implications of Harris v. Quinn in two recent in a radio interviews. Meanwhile, home care unions are signing up members and winning elections.

Today the Supreme Court will hear arguments on whether "neutrality agreements" are really just a bribe from the employer, and therefore illegal.

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