Jane Slaughter

The company’s tight control of drivers makes them nearly as regimented as workers on an assembly line.

The most clear-cut victories along the Walmart supply chain—though small in absolute terms—have been in warehouses, which is not surprising, because warehouses are a chokepoint in Walmart’s sophisticated logistics operations.

The $2.2 trillion in goods that enters the U.S. from abroad each year must pass quickly through the hands of logistics workers—dockworkers, port truckers, railroad workers, truck drivers, and warehouse workers—before ending up in stores. A work stoppage at any point blocks the flow of not just iPhones and pajamas but also profits.

Auto Workers Protest 'Maquila' Conditions in U.S.

A group of auto workers and supporters will demonstrate at the International Auto Show in Detroit next Sunday and Monday, to call attention to the “maquiladora model” they say the auto companies are applying in their U.S. plants.

They decry “an agenda that allows permanent 'temporaries,' outsources in-plant jobs to companies paying as low as $9 an hour, and increases the pace of work.” Management, they say, no longer wants long-term employees but “prefers the maquiladora model, where one rarely lasts more than ten years.”

The New Year brings promises to ourselves: to join the gym, quit smoking, get back on the diet wagon. In looking for help, watch out for management "wellness" programs: they have a not-so-hidden agenda.

Union protesters at the Michigan Capitol today knocked down a tent erected by the Koch brothers, who helped bring right to work to the state. But despite the crowd’s anger, the governor signed the bills.

Advocates of Social Security are holding informational pickets today at 100 Social Security offices in 22 states. They’re led by workers from inside the offices themselves, who know firsthand how much the monthly check means to retirees and people with disabilities.

Ford Workers Sit Down, Slow Down Over Late Paycheck

Workers who make underbodies for the Mustang pulled off a mini-strike and work-to-rule last Friday. These are the sorts of wildcat actions that were frequent in the United Auto Workers’ early days—and a lot faster than the “obey now, grieve later, wait months for a solution” grievance procedure.

If Congress and the President reach a “grand bargain” in the lame-duck session, seniors, the poor, and the disabled will pay for it—and it won’t be a good buy. Here are three ways politicians are hoping to cut your Social Security benefits.

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